Technology Grants

6 Things to Know Before Writing a Grant

 
  1. According to board policy, you need to have principal approval BEFORE you submit a grant.
  2. Your grant should align with Alpine’s Vision for Learning.
  3. There is a technology approval form for any grant involving technology and apps that must be submitted and approved BEFORE your grant application can be submitted.
  4. If you are requesting technology, be sure that you are requesting items from the approved hardware list. All exceptions must be approved by technology.
  5. Not following the proper procedures could result in disqualification for the grant, or even worse, having to send the funds or equipment back.
  6. Since you are using your position as a teacher for Alpine School District to generate funds, any equipment or applications purchased with grant funds are property of Alpine School District and will remain in the district should you choose to leave. Unless otherwise specified by the grant, technology or licensing will stay in the school with the team you were on when you received the grant.

Procedures for Applying for a Grant in Alpine School District


Once you have decided on which grant to apply for, follow these steps:

  1. Make sure your grant proposal aligns with Alpine’s Vision for Learning and the Gears Model.
  2. If you are requesting devices or hardware, double-check to make sure you have requested devices from the approved technology purchasing list.
  3. If you are requesting apps or software, check to see what information is required for student use. Any app or software that requires personally identifiable information beyond student first name, last name, and email is in violation of Student Data Privacy and will require principal and district approval.
  4. Discuss your proposal with your principal and ensure you have his/her support and approval.
  5. Submit the technology grant approval form and wait for approval from technology. Make necessary changes if requested. An explanation of the purpose of the form can be found here.
  6. Once you have received approval, you are safe to submit your grant application.

Grant Writing Tips

 

Be sure to carefully read the grant rules and guidelines.

  • Don’t include identifying information, such as your name, school name, mascot, district name, or city. This will automatically disqualify your grant.
  • Grants that are creative and unique stand out. Grants that are too similar to others or copied/pasted could be disqualified.
  • Check to see if there is a rubric or application guide that will be used to score the grant.
  • Know the process of the grant. Will the money be sent to the school? Will the devices be sent to the school?

Watch what you say.

  • Don’t say disparaging things about the district, community, or the legislature in an attempt to gain sympathy for grant funds. It often backfires.
  • Be accurate in what you say. 
  • Don’t write a “me too” grant. Grant readers aren’t inspired by people saying that the reason they should have something is because the teacher across the hall has something. 

Be strategic in your writing.

  • Be prepared to submit your grant many, many times. If you write strategically, you can use your grant numerous times with simple modifications for several different grant pools.
  • Even if it is a well-written grant, you still need to be prepared to submit it more than once.
  • Your grant needs to STAND OUT. You must impress grant readers in only a few minutes. They could be reading 500 other grants in that same sitting.

Make a good plan.

  • Propose a well-thought-out plan and make sure your grant matches that plan. For example, if you are proposing to improve literacy in your whole class, but you are only asking for 5 Chromebooks, you need to explain how those 5 Chromebooks will help your whole class.
  • Consider how many students your grant will impact. If you would like to have the grant impact more students, consider writing it as a team. This will allow the tech to benefit more than one class of students.
  • Does your grant align with Alpine’s Vision for Learning? Does it align with the goals in your building and those of your team?
  • Will you be the only one on your team that will have access to the equipment being requested? Will this impact collaboration?
  • Have a good, solid plan for refreshing your devices.
    • Golden Example: “I have provided a letter from my principal that states that if these devices accomplish my goals, he will find funds to refresh the devices after 3 years.”
    • Silver Example: “I will work hard to ensure my principal sees the value of these devices. If this works, I will ask my principal to find funds to refresh the devices after 3 years.”
    • Bronze Example: “I will write another grant.”
  • Don’t leave responses blank or write that you don’t know. Make an actual plan. If you don’t know the answer, have a conversation with your principal or your Innovative Learning Coach.

 

 


Educators of America
 MicroGrant Program

Applications are reviewed quarterly (January, April, July, October)
The Educators of America MicroGrant funds teacher grants from $250-$5,000 that help to better student achievement through the use of technology.

Donors Choose 

DonorsChoose.org enables teachers to request materials and resources for their classrooms and makes these project requests available to individual donors through its website.

 

 

STEM Action Center Classroom Grant 

“Grants provide funds to enhance everyday learning, assist students in extracurricular STEM competitions and support access to hands-on STEM experiences and activities.”

 

CenturyLink Teachers and Technology Grant

Accepting applications until January 12, 2020
The CenturyLink Clarke M. Williams Foundation will consider requests of up to $5,000 submitted by full-time classroom teachers employed by a public or private school in a CenturyLink residential service area or the Corporate locations listed above.

 

100% for Kids

Mini Grants ($50-$1,000), School Grants ($1,000-$5,000), and Major Project ($5,000+) Grants available. Grants are reviewed on a monthly or quarterly basis, depending on the level of grant requested.

 

Resources